Sedahlia is my second historical novel and has a history of its own. It is actually the first work that got me started on this journey and has been nearly 20 years in the making. I actually quit my engineering job to start writing it. Along the way I would change careers entirely and write and publish two other books. Meanwhile I never let go of my dream, my vision to be a best selling author. It’s hard to believe two decades have passed since I first conceived of Jessie and John, Rachel and Johnny. The story kept evolving and growing into the historical familyRead More →

Conventional wisdom is that doctors shouldn’t treat themselves. In a similar vein it is said that authors shouldn’t edit their own work. I must confess, I am guilty of the latter. Editing can be expensive; although I do believe it is worth the expense, if you can afford it. I am a bit of a perfectionist, though my writing is far from perfect. I do edit as I go, and reread and rewrite countless times before publication. I also use a plethora of resources, both print and online. I am also guilty of consciously breaking some grammatical rules, although some of them apparently aren’t rulesRead More →

Just when I defend Amazon, I find out they now have a new proposal to pay authors only for the pages read. Of course this can only apply to ebooks. It gives readers the creepy assurance that someone knows your every reading move. Amazon has their eyes on you and your reading habits and they are constantly looking for ways to increase their market share and profitability. I can’t blame them. I would do the same, but I am an artist, and I want to be compensated for my art. Funny, but when you buy a hard copy of a book, you’ve bought it. It’sRead More →

I recently added my “two-cents” to a debate about Amazon and self-publishing. Most of the commenters seemed to believe that the proliferation of platforms that allow anyone to publish and call themselves an author is a bad thing. They were concerned that there were no filters out there to separate the good from the bad. They were concerned that anyone could publish and call themselves an author. They were concerned that there was too much “fluff” in the marketplace and that would devalue writing in general. Those arguments are legitimate, but selfishly perhaps, they don’t concern me. The consumer will decide what they will orRead More →